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Anemhor

 

Anemhor1, god's father, prophet, master of the secrets of the temple of Ptah of Rosetau, of the Serapeum, of the Osireion of Rutiset, and of the Anubeion, hereditary prince, prophet of Ptah, stm-priest2, son of Nefer(ibre?)3, married Renpet-neferet4, father of Nesisti-Pedubast5; here identified6 with Anemhor7, god's father, prophet, master of the secrets of the temple of Ptah of Rosetau8, son of Neferibre9, probably by Herib10; died before year 23 of Ptolemy II = 263/211.

[1] Not in PP. PP IX 5365 implicitly accepts Quaegebeur's identification of Anemhor with an HPM Nesisti, as Nesisti-Anemhor, but does not actually mention the name Anemhor.

Quaegebeur's argument for identifying Anemhor with an HPM Nesisti depends upon his identification of Renpet-neferet mother of HPM Nesisti-Pedubast by an unnamed father with Renpet-neferet mother of Khonsiu, who died in 249, by an HPM Nesisti -- see J. Quaegebeur, JNES 30 (1971) 239, 265 (1). J. Quaegebeur in D. J. Crawford et al, Studies on Ptolemaic Memphis 47, 51 accepts that Vienna 82 names the father of Nesisti-Pedubast as Anemhor but argues that Nesisti-Pedubast's double-barrelled name shows that Anemhor could have been a second name for Nesisti HPM.

However, as D. Devauchelle, CdE 58 (1983) 135, 142 notes, Quaegebeur overlooks the point that Anemhor is not called an HPM on Vienna 82. On his reconstruction of statues Alexandria 27806, 15733 and 17534, Quaegebeur (in D. J. Crawford et al, Studies on Ptolemaic Memphis 47, 58f.) proposes that there are other HPMs who are not named with that title because they did not have it at the time these statues were made, during the lifetime of their predecessors, who are not named as "deceased". Whether or not this argument is correct, it cannot apply to Vienna 82, since Anemhor, who in any case lived 7 generations before Pedubast III, the dedicant of Vienna 82, is named as "deceased".

The High Priest of Ptah in Memphis was clearly at the apex of the priestly hierarchy in Ptolemaic times, so the omission of the title on stele Vienna 82 is unlikely to be a casual matter. In the absence of positive evidence of the double name Nesisti-Anemhor, the simpler reconstruction is to suppose that Nesisti HPM, husband of Renpet-neferet and father of Khonsiu, is a distinct individual from Anemhor, husband of Renpet-neferet and father of HPM Nesisti-Pedubast.

As to the question of whether there was one Renpet-neferet, wife of both Nesisti HPM and Anemhor, or two near contemporary women, each married to a different priest, see discussion under Renpet-neferet. Ý

[2] Stele Vienna 82 (per Reymond - though D. Devauchelle, CdE 58 (1983) 135, 142, omits the titles associated with temples other than that of Ptah). Statue Alexandria 27806 has very similar but not quite identical titles for the first part of this string: god's father, beloved of the god, master of the secrets of the temple of Ptah at Rutistet. E. A. E. Reymond, Or 47 (1977) 1, 6 calls him a high priest of Memphis, but implicitly retracts this in E. A. E. Reymond, From the Records of a Priestly Family from Memphis 59 no 2. On the toponym "Rutiset", translated by Reymond and H. S. K. Bakhry (MDAIK 28 (1972) 75) as "Rakotis", see discussion here. Ý

[3] Stele Vienna 82 line 19, statue Alexandria 27806. See discussion under Neferibre for the reasons to identify these two listings. Ý

[4] Stele BM 379, as mother of Nesisti-Pedubast. See J. Quaegebeur, JNES 30 (1971) 239, 246. Ý

[5] Stele Vienna 82 line 19, statue Alexandria 27806. See discussion under Nesisti-Pedubast. Ý

[6] See discussion under Neferibre. Ý

[7] PP III 5440. Ý

[8] Stele Vienna 157. Ý

[9] Stele Vienna 157. See discussion under Neferibre. Ý

[10] See discussion under Herib. Ý

[11] Stele BM 379 states that Nesisti-Pedubast began receiving honours from the king in year 23, and it is reasonable to infer that his father was dead by this date. E. A. E. Reymond, From the Records of a Priestly Family from Memphis 34, identifies this as year 23 of Ptolemy I = 283/2, and supposes that it marks the death of Nesisti-Pedubast's father Anemhor. However, since the honours bestowed include the priesthoods of Philotera and Arsinoe II, which are listed before his appointment as HPM, it is evident that the king involved must be Ptolemy II, hence year 23 = 263/2. At this time Ptolemy II was clearly reorganising the Egyptian priesthood and introducing the dynastic cult. The timing of Nesisti-Pedubast's appointments was probably affected by this process -- it is possible that his appointment as HPM represents the revival of the office. Thus, all we can say is that his father had in all probability died at some time before this date. Ý

Update Notes:

16 March 2002: Created page

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